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Better Than Banked Blood? Recycling a Patient’s Own Blood during Surgery


Patients whose own red blood cells are recycled and given back to them during heart surgery have healthier blood cells that are better able to carry oxygen where it is most needed compared to those who get transfusions of blood stored in a blood bank, according to new research.
The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health’s National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (R01 HL105296-03 and R01 HL1092259-01) and the New York Community Trust

medresearch:

image source

Better Than Banked Blood? Recycling a Patient’s Own Blood during Surgery

Patients whose own red blood cells are recycled and given back to them during heart surgery have healthier blood cells that are better able to carry oxygen where it is most needed compared to those who get transfusions of blood stored in a blood bank, according to new research.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health’s National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (R01 HL105296-03 and R01 HL1092259-01) and the New York Community Trust

medresearch
medresearch:

Researchers Identify Regulation Process of Protein Linked to Bipolar Disorder
Researchers from Tufts University have gained new insight into a protein associated with bipolar disorder. The study, published in the June 3 issue of Science Signaling, reveals that calcium channels in resting neurons activate the breakdown of Sp4, which belongs to a class of proteins called transcription factors that regulate gene expression.
This study, led by Grace Gill, identifies a molecular mechanism regulating Sp4 activity. Her previous research had determined that reduced levels of Sp4 in the brain are associated with bipolar disorder. Her work overall suggests that misregulation of Sp4 may contribute to the development of bipolar disorder.
Read more

medresearch:

Researchers Identify Regulation Process of Protein Linked to Bipolar Disorder

Researchers from Tufts University have gained new insight into a protein associated with bipolar disorder. The study, published in the June 3 issue of Science Signaling, reveals that calcium channels in resting neurons activate the breakdown of Sp4, which belongs to a class of proteins called transcription factors that regulate gene expression.

This study, led by Grace Gill, identifies a molecular mechanism regulating Sp4 activity. Her previous research had determined that reduced levels of Sp4 in the brain are associated with bipolar disorder. Her work overall suggests that misregulation of Sp4 may contribute to the development of bipolar disorder.

Read more